THE PSB MEGA MERGER: AN OVERVIEW

On the 30th of August, 2019, Finance Minister (FM), Nirmala Sitharam announced the merger of 10 major public sector banks (PSBs) to reduce the number of players in the banking scenario from a whopping 27 to 12. This news comes in wake of the disappointing news that India faced a 5% GDP growth in the preceding quarter. It is expected that the merger will increase the CASA (Current to Savings Account Ratio) and enhance lending capacity. These reforms were deemed necessary to foster the idea of India becoming a $5 trillion economy. Illustrated below shall be the expected scenario if the mergers are proven successful:

Merger between

Rank (based on size)

Number of Branches

Total Business Size

(Rs in lakh crore)

Punjab National Bank (A), Oriental Bank of Commerce and United Bank – Merger I

2nd

11,437

17.95 (1.5 times of current)

Canara Bank (A) and Syndicate Bank – Merger II

4th

10,342

15.2 (1.5 times of current)

Union Bank of India (A), Andhra Bank and Corporation Bank – Merger III

5th

9,609

14.59 (2 times of current)

Indian Bank (A) and Allahabad Bank – Merger IV

7th

6,104

8.08 (2 times of current)

(A) Anchor Bank

It was also announced that Rs 55,250 crore of capital infusion will take place to ease credit growth and regulatory compliance. Now we’ll look at the capital infusion expected to take place to aid the mega mergers:

Bank

Recapitalization (Rs in crore)

Punjab National Bank

16,000

Union Bank

11,700

Bank of Baroda

7,000

Canara Bank

6,500

Indian Bank

2,500

Indian Overseas Bank

3,800

Central Bank

3,300

UCO Bank

2,100

United Bank of India

1,600

Punjab and Sind Bank

750

FM also announced multifarious administrative reforms to increase accountability and remove political intermediation. Bank management is made accountable as the board will now be responsible for evaluating the performance of General Manager and Managing Director. It is mandatory to train directors for their roles thus improving leadership in the PSBs. The role of the Non-Official Director is made synonymous to that of an independent director. In order to attract talent, banks have to pay competitive remuneration to Chief Risk Officers.

The banks were merged on three criteria – the CRR should be greater than 10.875%, the CET ratio should be above 7% (which is above the Basel norms) and the NPAs should be less than 6%. However, Syndicate and Canara bank have not been able to meet the criteria.

Post consolidation facts and figures:

  • Total Business Share
  • Ratios (all amounts in %)

MERGER – I

PNB

OBC

United Bank of India

Post-Merger

CASA Ratio

42.16

29.4

51.45

40.52

PCR

61.72

56.53

51.17

59.59

CET-I

6.21

9.86

10.14

7.46

CRAR Ratio

9.73

12.73

13

10.77

Net NPA Ratio

6.55

5.93

8.67

6.61

MERGER – II

Canara Bank

Syndicate Bank

Post-Merger

CASA Ratio

29.18

32.58

30.21

PCR

41.48

48.83

44.32

CET-I

8.31

9.31

8.62

CRAR Ratio

11.90

14.23

12.63

Net NPA Ratio

5.37

6.16

5.62

MERGERIII

Union Bank

Andhra Bank

Corporation Bank

Post-Merger

CASA Ratio

36.10

31.39

31.59

33.82

PCR

58.27

68.62

66.60

63.07

CET-I

8.02

8.43

10.39

8.63

CRAR Ratio

11.78

13.69

12.30

12.39

Net NPA Ratio

6.85

5.73

5.71

6.30

MERGER – IV

Indian Bank

Allahabad Bank

Post-Merger

CASA Ratio

34.75

49.49

41.65

PCR

49.13

74.15

66.21

CET-I

10.96

9.65

10.63

CRAR Ratio

13.21

12.51

12.89

Net NPA Ratio

3.75

5.22

4.39

Advantages:

  • Economies of scale.
  • Efficiency in operation.
  • Better NPA management.
  • High lending capacity of the newly formed entities.
  • Strong national presence and global reach.
  • Risk can be spread over and thus will be minimized.
  • Lower operational cost leading to lower cost of borrowing.
  • Increased customer base, organic growth of market share and business quantum.
  • Banking practices reform announced to boost accountability and professionalism.
  • Appointment of CRO (Chief Risk Officer) to enhance management effectiveness.
  • Centralized functioning promoting a central database of customers.

Disadvantages:

  • The slowdown witnessed by the economy coupled with the dangerously low demand in the automobile sector will maintain the existing situation pessimism.
  • The already existing exposure of NBFCs in the individual constituent banks will be magnified as the merged entities shall have more than 10% loan exposure to NBFCs and thus, in effect, the liquidity pressure that comes along with it.
  • As history dictates, the merger of these eminent banks will cause near-term problems with respect to restructuring, recapitalization, operation, flexibility and costs.
  • Near-term growth shall be hindered and core profitability may suffer.
  • Compliance becomes a huge barrier.
  • Difficult to merge human resources and their respective work cultures post-merger – this will in turn lead to low morale and inefficient workforce

Outlook:

The mergers were announced with a very noble idea in mind; however, the timing is a bit unfortunate. During these times of economic slowdown, India needs its bankers devoting their time to boost the economy. With the merger happening, the banks will be more pre-occupied with the integration process rather than enhancing the economic growth. Merely combining banks will not help enhance credit capacity, it is also important to see whether synergies in reality will be created (or if it is merely on paper).

The share of assets of the top three or four banks account for only 30%-32%. Thus, the banks still remain fragmented for a major part – systemic risk or contagion effect shall not be a problem as of now. Although this is the case, out of the four mergers not one of them can be said to be financially strong. This is a phenomenon of blind leading the blind; it cannot be expected that two financially weak banks can merge into one financially strong entity. “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.”

This announcement comes at a time when even the results of the previous mergers (e.g. Bank of Baroda) have not yielded any fruit and the PSBs have recently jumped back from a long stress scenario. It seems as if there is no common theme in the mergers (i.e. retail, corporate or SME), no particular skill-set that has been emphasized upon. Rather, it was just assumed that all the banks fall under the same template and a haphazard combination was made – in such a case, there is a slim chance of synergy creation. Also, with no major theme in hand the multifarious objectives will confuse the banks with respect to the pressing matters at hand.

According to technical experts, it might take around three to four years to integrate the existing IT systems of the banks. Although all of the use the CBS, heavy customization is required, mobile apps need to be in sync, backend functions have to be centralized effectively.

As for the case of resolution of NPAs, it might actually become easier and faster. Earlier, the bankers had to talk to their counterparts, the approach the senior management to come to a resolution. Now, with these institutions merging and with lesser levels to report to, a solution plan can be implemented at the earliest with considerably less effort. Apart from this, now that the banks will have a common database and a larger network, they can increase the services offered at a higher level at lower costs – this might show an increment in the fees earned and in turn, the profitability. It is expected that the Anchor banks will be benefitted more from the mergers as the swap ratio will be in their favour.

Author
Chandreyee Sengupta
Team Member- Equity Research & Valuation
(MSc Finance, NMIMS Mumbai. Batch 2019-21)

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Impact of MSME on Indian Economy

INTRODUCTION TO MSME

The Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) sector has emerged as a highly vibrant and dynamic sector the Indian Economy over the last 5 decades. MSME Sector has been one of the most focused sectors in prospects of Investments and has contributed significantly for our country’s Social Development as well as Economic development. MSME has also promoted women empower and has helped in generating largest employment opportunities at lower capital cost, next only to agriculture. It has helped abundantly by promoting the term ‘Entrepreneurship’. MSME have merged as complementary to large industries as ancillary units and they are widening their domain across all sectors of the Indian Economy as well as producing a range of Products and Services which will help to meet the needs of not only domestic market but International markets also. Government of India has never failed to support MSME in all ways possible and have promoted MSME sectors by starting a number of Schemes and other Incentives for them. The Ministry of MSME runs Various Schemes aimed at financial assistance, Infrastructure development, technology assistance and Upgradation, skill development and training, enhancing competitiveness and market assistance of MSMEs.

GOVERNMENT SUPPORT TO MSME

The ministry of MSME is doing its best to help MSMEs reaching new high and contributing more and more to The Indian Economy. The ministry recently came up with some Policy Initiatives like:

  • Ease of Registration Process of MSMEs- Udyog Aadhaar Memorandum
  • Framework for Revival and Rehabilitation of MSMEs
  • MSME Data Bank
  • MyMSME
  • Direct Benefit Transfer in the M/o MSME
  • GST rollout & Ministry of MSME
  • Digital Payments
  • Grievance Monitoring
  • MSME Samadhaan: To Address Delayed Payments to MSEs
  • MSME- Sambhandh
  • Technology Centre Systems Programme(TCSP)
  • Partnership with Industry
  • International MoUs
  • MoU with NSIC for provision of services for MSMEs
  • Swachhta Pakhwada by Ministry of MSME
  • National Scheduled Caste / Scheduled Tribe Hub

These Policies are being formulated to help MSME reach new heights and contribute more in Economic and Social Development of the Country. The Schemes by Government help MSMEs Financially/in-kind for their betterment. Government of India has Supported and Promoted MSME Sector not only on Domestic Levels but in International Markets also. The contribution made by MSME in development of Economy and Social Life in backward areas has been spectacular.

ROLE OF MSME IN INDIA

The MSMEs have been a great contributor to the expansion of entrepreneurial endeavours through business innovation. Since past 9 Years MSME have contributed around 29% in GDP of India(Source: CSO, Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation). The Gross Value added by MSMEs in contribution to Indian Economy as on 2015-16 was INR 1,24,58,642 Crs.

In India 324.88 Lakhs MSMEs are located in Rural Areas whereas 309 Lakhs MSMEs are located in Urban Areas. Shockingly 630.52 Lakhs of these MSMEs falls under Micro Sector whereas 3.31 Lakh MSME falls under Small sector and only 0.05 Lakh falls under Medium Sector(Data as per MSME Annual Report 2017-18). MSMEs have a big impact on Micro Sector helping small entrepreneur’s achieving their dreams.

Not only was these, it also seen that 22.24% of the ownership of these Enterprises in rural areas were of female. In urban areas Female ownership of these enterprises came around 18.42%. MSME have led a movement in supporting Female entrepreneurs and have helped them in achieving their dreams. One more interesting fact is that 50% of MSMEs in India have ownership of OBCs followed by 12.45% of SCs and ST having ownership of 4.10%. In total ~66% of MSMEs in India are owned by Socially Backward Groups.

Estimated number of MSMEs (Activity Wise) is as follows:

Activity Category

Estimated Number of Enterprises (in Lakh)

Share(%)

RURAL

URBAN

TOTAL

Manufacturing

114.14

82.50

196.65

31

Trade

108.71

121.64

230.35

36

Other Services

102.00

104.85

206.85

33

Electricity*

0.03

0.01

0.03

0

ALL

324.88

309.00

638.88

100

*Non-captive electricity generation and transmission and distribution by units not registered with the Central Electricity Authority (CEA)

MSMEs have helped women entrepreneurs, socially backward groups in excelling and have been a major player in generating employment. Truly Micro Sector has been a major contributor in Social and Economic development of our nation.

Following Table shows how MSME helped in Employment Generation:

Activity Category

Employment (in Lakh)

Share(%)

RURAL

URBAN

TOTAL

Manufacturing

186.56

173.86

360.41

32

Trade

160.64

226.54

387.18

35

Other Services

150.53

211.69

362.22

33

Electricity*

0.06

0.02

0.07

0

ALL

497.78

612.10

1109.89

100

*Non-captive electricity generation and transmission

Interestingly, out of the total Estimated Employment Generated around 97% are generated by Micro sector which shows how it has been aiding in development of our nation and shaping a bright future.

MSME Sector has always been supported by Government and Big industries in every ways possible and MSME have returned the favour.

“No dream is too big and no dreamer is too small” these saying have been proved right as the smallest of enterprises have supported millions of peoples dream by providing them with employment.

*The figures were taken from the government MSME Annual Report of 2017-2018

Author
Aditya Majmudar
Volunteer- Equity Research & Valuation
(MSc Finance, NMIMS Mumbai. Batch 2018-20)

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Who is liable for cyber fraud?

With the rise in digital transactions ad their spread to the interiors of the country, cyber frauds are on the rise. In this situation, the question arises who is actually liable for the same. Subscribe to Areesha Fatma Channel on YouTube
Areesha Fatma
(M.Sc. Economics, NMIMS – Mumbai 2018-20)

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on LinkedIn

Libra – Facebook’s cryptocurrency

Facebook has revealed plans for a new global digital currency, claiming it will enable billions of people around the world without a bank account to make money transfers. The digital currency is called Libra and will allow its billions of users to make financial transactions across the globe, in a move that could potentially shake up the world’s banking system.

Facebook revealed the details of its crypto currency, Libra which will let you buy things or send money to people with nearly zero fees. It released its white paper explaining Libra and the technicalities of its blockchain system before a public launch in the first half of 2020.

The effort announced with 27 partners right now ranging from Master Card to Uber and should launch sometime next year with 100 partners, as it hopes. It is a stable coin backed by a basket of actual currencies and marketable securities. Facebook will only get a single vote in its governance of the crypto currency along with its partners.

The currency will be run by the Libra association as Facebook is distancing itself from the direct management. Facebook’s involvement will be run via a new subsidiary called Calibra that handles its crypto dealings and protects users’ privacy by not mingling an individual’s payments with his/her facebook data. By this an individual’s real identity won’t be tied to his/her publically visible transactions. Calibra will also be launching a digital wallet for Libra, as a standalone IOS, android application and also as a functionality within whatsapp and messenger. Libra is the underlying technology but Calibra is likely how most people will interact with the currency. It will be the first crypto currency wallet that millions of people will have access as it takes advantage of facebook’s massive ecosystem with billions of potential users.

One of the biggest problems that the regulators will have to tackle is drug dealers and money launderers from getting their hands on Libra and using it to move money from the eyes of the law enforcement like with any crypto currency.

“The issue is that once you apply traditional regulation to tokens that are backed by money in the bank then those tokens start to look a lot like normal fiat money, after all most money we use today – credit card, apple pay, PayPal etc is just the digital representation of money that the banks promise to ultimately backup. This is the exact same thing except on a blockchain”- Techcrunch

Libra Whitepaper states that unlike previous blockchains which view the blockchain as a collection of transactions, the Libra blockchain is a single data structure that records the history of transactions and states over time. Facebook has created a whole language for writing commands on its protocol called MOVE (programming language), which is an open source prototype in anticipation of a global collaborative effort to advance this new ecosystem.  The facebook has done its homework to cherry pick the best bits and pieces of other crypto project to create Libra.

Like bitcoin there is no real identity on the blockchain; from the perspective of the block chain itself you don’t exist, only public private key pairs exist. Like hyperledger it’s permissioned (at least to start); initially the consensus structure of Libra will be dozens of organisation that will run nodes on the network, validating transactions. Like tezos it comes with on-chain governance; the only entities that can vote at the outset are founding members. Like ethereum, it makes currency programmable and in a number of ways the whitepaper defines interesting ways in which its users can interact with the core software and data structure. For example anyone can make a non-voting replica of the blockchain or run various read comments associated with objects such as smart contracts or a set of wallets defined on Libra. Crucially, Libra’s designers seem to agree with ethereum that running code should have a cause so as to all operations require payment of Libra as gas for it to run. Also like ethereum, it thinks proof of stake is the future but it is also not ready yet. Like binance’s coin it does a lot of burning. Like coda, users don’t need to hold on to the whole transaction history – states Coindesk.

Now needless to say, this is pulling a lot from the latest and greatest crypto ideas and collaborating it.

Facebook launched 2 crypto currencies, addition to Libra the project will also have a Libra investment token, which is how the stake holders (100 or so partners facebook hopes to have lined up on launch) will make money on this, as Libra itself is not supposed to fluctuate in value.

Unlike Libra a currency that will be broadly available to the public, the investment token is a security according to facebook that will be sold to a much more exclusive audience – the funding corporate members of the projects governing consortium known as the Libra association and accredited investors. While Libra will be backed by a basket of fiat currencies and government securities, interest earned on that collateral will go to holders of the investment token. As previously reported ahead of the official announcement, each of the 27 companies that facebook recruited to run validating nodes as founding members of the consortium, invested at least 10 million dollars for the privilege. The investment token is what they received as a financial reward, but that reward will only be meaningful if the network takes off – states Coindesk.

The assets in the reserve are low risk and low yield for early investors which will only materialise if the network is successful and the reserve grows to a substantial size, facebook said in one of the series of documents that supplement the Libra white paper.

This sound a lot like how an Initial Coin Offering – (ICO) has worked over the past of years, except without the expectation of price appreciation as the reward to early investors.

 We will have plenty of time and a lot of information to dig into in the coming months, but my bottom line and initial take is that the money we have today has not worked very well for all of us, furthering the gap between the rich and the poor. Libra (crypto currency) has the potential to bridge this gap but it has to bypass too many regulatory complications.

If facebook succeeds and receives cash for Libra, it and the other founding members of the Libra association could earn big dividends on the interest. If Libra gets hacked or proves unreliable lots of people around the world could lose their personal information and money. But it is clear that facebook has tried to reinvent money, we will have to wait and see if they can pull it off.

Author
Indrajith Aditya
Team Member – Equity Research and Valuation
(M.Sc. Finance, NMIMS – Mumbai 2018-20)


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Non-Performing Assets (NPA) of India: Journey so far and the road ahead!

“The failure of a loan usually represents miscalculations on both sides of the transaction or distortions in the lending process itself.”

— Radelet, Sachs, Cooper and Bosworth (1998)


In the recent times the newspapers have been filled with some or the other news, issues, policies, regulation or resolution of NPAs. The NPA ratio has come down to 9.3% in March, 2019 from 11.5% in March,2018 according to mention by RBI Governor Shaktikanda Das. 

Source: SCB’s GNPA Ratio,Financial Stability Report, RBI

According to RBI, the definition of NPA is: ‘An asset, including a leased asset, becomes non-performing when it ceases to generate income for the bank.’

A non-­performing asset (NPA) is a loan or an advance where the payment of principal/interest is due (in default) for 90 days or above.First, when there is a default of payment, till 90 days, the accounts are subsequently classified as Special Mention Accounts (SMA): SMA 0/1/2. Then after 90 days, these accounts are classified as NPAs.Further NPAs are classified into sub­standard,doubtful and loss assets.Any income for standard assets is recognized on accrual basis, but income from NPAs is recognized only when it is actually received.

Reasons for accumulation of NPAs:

Increasing cases of wilful defaults and frauds are often considered as the primary reason behind the accumulation of bad loans in the Indian banking system.

When an economy experiences healthy GDP growth, a substantial part of it is financed by the credit supplied by the banking system. As long as the GDP keeps growing, the repayment schedule does not get substantially affected. However, when the GDP growth slows down, the bad loans tend to increase due to macroeconomic factors, primarily among them are interest rate, inflation, unemployment and change in the exchange rates.Hence, bad loans accumulate as borrowers are unable to repay due to stalling/closure of the big development projects

Bank-related micro indicators such as capital adequacy, size of the bank, the history of NPA and return on financial assets also contribute to the accumulation of bad loans. NPAs, specifically in the Public Sector Banks (PSBs), have adverse effects on credit disbursement. Increasing amounts of bad loans prompt the banks to be extra cautious. This in turn has caused drying up of the credit channel to the economy, particularly industries, making economic revival more difficult.

Need for Solution

Reviving industrial credit is crucial for the health of the overall economy, because industry (particularly manufacturing) tends to create more employment.

Mounting bad loans suggests vulnerability in the system, wherein short-term deposit-taking banks have to extend credit for long-term big development projects. And this model is visibly failing. Hence NPAs put several small depositors of the banks, particularly in the PSB, at risk.

Also an improvement in the recovery rate and reduction in timeline for resolution for insolvent companies will increase investor confidence in Indian Bond Market.

Recognition of the problem and the solution:

NPAs story is not new in India and there have been several steps taken by the GOI on legal, financial and policy level reforms. In the year 1991, Narsimham committee recommended many reforms to tackle NPAs.

SICA Act, The Debt Recovery Tribunals (DRTs) – 1993, CIBIL: Credit Information Bureau (India) Limited-2000, LokAdalats – 2001, One-time settlement or OTS- compromise settlement-2001, SARFAESI Act- 2002, Asset Reconstruction Company (ARC), Corporate Debt Restructuring – 2008, 5:25 rule – 2014, Joint Lenders Forum – 2014, Mission Indradhanush – 2015, Strategic debt restructuring (SDR) – 2015, Asset Quality Review- 2015, Sustainable structuring of stressed assets (S4A)- 2016 were some of the techniques applied to tackle the problem by government and RBI.

Every method was entangled, rules were not that clear, there were lot of cases pending in front of DRTs owing to limited infrastructure, not enough field experts and hence, it took years for creditors to recover their money. India needed a structured process; thereby Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (IBC) -2016 came into existence.

It sets a time limit of 180 days which can be extended by another 90 days to complete the entire process. Some of the features of the code include the allocation of a new forum to carryout insolvency proceedings, setting up a dedicated regulator, creating a new class of insolvency professionals and another new class of information utility providers.

The forum where corporate insolvency proceedings can be initiated is the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) and appeals against its decisions can be made in the (National company Law Appellate Tribunal) NCLAT. The IBC vests the NCLT with all the powers of the DRT.

Insolvency professionals will have the task of monitoring and managing the business so that neither the creditors nor the debtor need worry about economic value being eroded by the other.On acceptance of the application by NCLT for proceeding for Corporate Insolvency Resolution Process (CIRP), Board of Directors of the company has to step down and Insolvency Professional takes the charge and the plan for revival or liquidation of the company, approved by majority of creditors is put in the action according to the IBC rules and timeframe.

It is predicted that the NCLT is focused on the legal process while the insolvency professional is focused on business matters.RBI listed out the 12 major accounts in India, which has the largest share of NPAs in the country.

Source : ICRA

Some great results have fared in: Ranking for ‘Resolving Insolvency’ But still there is a long way to go: Suggestions

As mentioned above, there is a mismatch of assets and liability for the banks. Banks’ assets are long term loans, whereas banks liabilities are short term deposits, which have landed banks in failures. Hence, it makes sense to say that commercial banks should be focusing on short term assets to match their short term liabilities. And for Long term projects, special purpose vehicles (SPV) should be created to fund a particular sector project and financial institution should be created to fund these SPVs and should be given incentives and proper regulation from the government.

Also, as recapitalization of PSBs is going on, a bank should first divide its assets into good and bad, meaning viable and unviable asset. Banks should be recapitalized according to viable assets to revive with its positive core rather than just giving out public money. By this, banks can also focus on their core business rather than managing NPAs and not contribute to slowing of the economic growth.

SICA Act in India was a ‘Debtor in Possession’ (DIP) Model just like U.S. Chapter 11. But there were flaws in the act compared to the U.S.model. There was also a problem in the assessment of viability of the company as only a few accounts were revived. ‘Another relevant fact is the definition of insolvency or ‘sickness’ under the SICA. The N.L. Mitra committee criticized the definition provided by SICA i.e. ‘at the end of any financial year, accumulated losses equal or exceed its entire net worth’ stating that this is the end rather than the initial point where the company’s problems begin.’

Time has changed, India made a comeback with ‘Creditor in Possession’ (CIP) Model of IBC inspired by U.K. owing to similarities in the judicial process and SMEs culture, but there is one problem. In SICA, debtors were made liable to take the proceeding to court if it is identified by them that company is in trouble. Under IBC there is no such amendment and hence there is a ‘problem of initiation’ which was clearly seen in the case of Jet Airways. Just because directors didn’t want to step down, they dragged the process, rejected lot of revival bids in early insolvency phase. And be it any reason, even the financial or operational creditor did not initiate the process.

Australia also followed CIP model, but faced the same problem and added the amendment to make directors liable for any default under their directorship, directors became scared to default and didn’t take any risky decision to grow the company making them stagnant. This also should not happen with India. But then Australia laid ‘Safe Harbor’ provision to ease out the rules. Hence still amendment in the IBC is required to make directors take help from outside professional for the revival of their company in the early insolvency stage itself.

On June 7,2019, RBI laid provision pertaining to rules for creditors to enter into a ‘review period’ in the first 30 days of default by the debtor account, and make a resolution plan for the concerned account and apply the plan in next 180 days to revive it. If the plan is not put into implementation, provision for this account is required to be increased more and more as days pass. This might lead the banks to initiate the CIRP of the account under IBC and may overcome the ‘Initiation Problem’ from the side of creditors. According to this new frame work for stressed assets, the above mentioned rule is now applicable to Small Finance Banks and NBFCs, as they have become an integral part of the economy and needs to be properly regulated to retain the trust of investors.

There can be a solution to mitigate the problem of NPA by forming a‘Bad bank’. But this is a very risky model as it requires extensive research and cross-country analysis as the taxpayers’ money is on table.

In India Secondary Market for Corporate Loans, particularly distressed loan is in the making, taking inspiration from U.S. and European market. But there is a problem of transfer pricing of these distressed assets. India will have to design a proper mechanism, a platform and regulation of valuation techniques using DCF method, so that there isn’t much of a gap between the bid and the ask price of the assets and so the market remains active and transparent.

India and the banking system requires a major turn around and all the financial professional will have to put in the work.

Author
Vishwa Parekh
Volunteer – Fixed Income & Risk Management
(M.Sc. Finance, NMIMS – Mumbai. Batch 2018-20)

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How Does The 2019 General Election Results Alter The Market Dynamics For India?

The stock market indices and the share price of the companies listed on these indices constantly keeps changing due to company related factors and market-related factors. The company related factors are usually its annual performance in terms of revenue generated, market size captured, innovative product/service offered, capturing various synergies that derive its value on the index, etc. The key elements that drive the market-related factors are the macro events that take place which dictates the direction in which a particular company or the whole industry tends to move towards.

The prominent macro events such as inflation, monsoon, trade policies, financial factors, trade war, oil prices, global markets etc. are a few to name. But, one of the most crucial factors is the government that is ruling the country as it’s the epicentre of all the policies, reforms, schemes and decisions made in the country which acts as an indicator of the road which is ahead to come. Hence the importance of the motto and ambition of the incoming government is so crucial. However, the market overall will tend to thrive in the long-run irrespective as to which government comes into power.

As seen in the table below are the annual returns derived by the BSE index over the tenor of the ruling government. Here, it’s clearly visible that the returns derived from the market index have more to it than the party ruling the government.  

The markets always hope for a stable government at the Centre so as to have consistency and stability in the economy as the government is the sole authority of framing the prominent economic policies of India. The foreign players generally prefer to invest in economies that have a stable government with strong policies with long-term visibility. The Indian equities have witnessed foreign inflows worth a net of $6.7 billion from January to March, which is more than the outflows of $4.4 billion in 2018. This optimism has kept foreign investors bullish on India and the market is benefitting from huge emerging market inflows.

India is set to emerge as a USD 5 trillion economy over a period of five years and as a USD 10 trillion economy eight years after that. This gives a clear indication of the growth prospects and the sectors in which the opportunities will arise on these lines. In terms of fundamentals of the country’s economy, its inflation has come down from over 10% five years ago to about 4.6%, the fiscal deficit has come down from almost 6% to 3% which are very important indicators. We have already grown in the last five years from being the 11th largest economy in the world to the sixth. This has led to ease in the monetary policy (which we already have started to witness) which in turn can boost consumption.

To attain this kind of scales, the country needs inclusive and sustainable growth. And for this, the focus needs to be on physical and social infrastructure. The government has been taking a number of initiatives to address and correct the imbalances in both the economic growth and development of the country. BJP’s election manifesto this time around was focused on infrastructural development which has already started to witness growth from the ground level during their last tenor.

The government is expected to make a capital investment of Rs 100 lakh crore by 2024 in the infrastructure sector as well as announce a new industrial policy to improve the competitiveness of manufacturing and services. This has given a more optimistic outlook going forward. Hence, companies of sectors such as Infrastructure, Power, Capital goods, Manufacturing and Construction will witness significant progress and growth over the government’s next tenure. Some sectors such as FMCG, IT, Metals. Pharma keeps growing irrespective of the election cycles.

With the progressive economic steps of implementing Goods & Service Tax, De-monetization, the government looks to roll out further steps to organize and streamline the conduct of businesses and trades. Hence it would advisable to avoid the sectors or companies which have an unorganised structure and a low sustainability business model.

The Modi government’s return to power is likely to propel the agriculture sector stocks as well. New agricultural reforms, policies, financial aids availed to the farmers and the export policies and incentives has improved the quantity and quality of the output which can be used for domestic consumption as well as for exports.  This will leave more money in the hands of farmers which will be spent on buying tractors, cars and two-wheelers in the rural market.

The power sector has also witnessed a significant improvement in energy deficit situation over the last four years of the tenure. The country’s energy deficit, which remained in the range of 8% and 10% during 2011-13, has improved in FY14 to 4-4.5%, and subsequently contracted to a mere 0.7%.

With the implementing of Housing for All, Rural Development & Electrification, Smart City Projects, development of roadway and waterway connectivity, and many such policies being already rolled on and many being in the pipeline as well, industries that have been directly linked with these schemes and policies such as construction, building materials and accessories etc. will directly benefit from the same.

Banking sector stocks are also likely to rise since sales in the auto sector, demand for housing loans and agriculture loans will lead to a rise in their loan books. The re-organisation of the increased banking NPA’s has also propelled these stocks towards profitability. Also, banking stocks have been at the forefront of almost all rallies on the benchmark indices.

The Make in India policy and Start-up incentives provided by this government is expected to increase the employment opportunities in this market. With the kind of global recognition India is gaining throughout has been reflected by the way other economies and government is viewing India as an investment destination. This has led to strengthened relations with major member nations giving the country a much greater economic, financial, technological and political horizon to look forward to.

Though many of the investors have a different philosophy and they prefer not to try and time the stock market. They prefer to stay invested for a long time and usually have a diversified portfolio which can smoothen the impact of the immediate volatility of the market. However, analysis of this event helps to not only smoothen the immediate impact of the volatility in the market but also helps to plan the portfolio reshuffling. Thus, understanding the vision and policy-making of the government over the next tenure will help to identify the sectors that will grow in the upcoming tenor and investing in the most efficient business model of the company in that particular sector can give the investors multi-beggar returns. 

Author
Dhrumil Wani
Team Leader – Equity Research & Valuation
(M.Sc. Finance, NMIMS – Mumbai. Batch 2018-20)

Connect with Dhrumil on LinkedIn



Is recession coming soon?

India’s GDP

If we look into the downfall of India’s GDP in 2008 and 2012 there was a huge downfall. And currently, it is also showing downtrend which can show us that in the near future there are chances of GDP going further down and some other indicators support the fall in this GDP.

There are some factors which are making us believe that there is a huge chance of recession in the near future.

Nifty Returns

As we can see in the table below, there has been a reduction in the return given by the markets in the years when the GDP Growth rate is low. This clearly suggests the positive relation between market returns and GDP Growth rate

YIELD CURVE

If the difference between the interest short run and long-run interest rates starts to reduce, it means that the economic position is weakening. The yield curve is steeper for India and the growth rate of India is diminishing.


If we see the graph above, though the difference has increased it is presumed to converge in the near future and can lead to a slowdown in India’s economy.

P/E and EPS

The red line indicates the P/E, P/E ratio has crossed the EPS line, this can be indicative that the index is overvalued and can fall in the near future. As in a period of 6 months, the market has been performing good but P/E didn’t cross EPS. So if the correction comes in the market there are chances of the market falling.

These are some of the indicators which may predict a slowdown in the recent future if the indicators tend to state the information in a similar way and do not diverges.

Unemployment Rate

According to experienced economists, the unemployment rate has been at 45 years high. In 2018, the unemployment rate rose to 6.1 %.

If we see, in the year 2008 the unemployment rate was at a maximum of 4.116%. Now it is way higher than the last few years. So this is one of the indicators stating the downtrend in India’s GDP in current and upcoming years.

Chances of war with Pakistan?

Since 1947 partition, India and Pakistan have come across there have been many reasons for conflict between India and Pakistan. There are huge chances of Indo-Pak war, because of ceasefire violation. On 14th Feb 2019, terror strike which lead to the death of 40 Central Reserve Police Force personnel were killed on Feb 14, 2019. After 12 days of Pulwana attack, India strike on Jaish-e-Mohammed on Pakistan soil which lead to a huge tension between India and Pakistan. This tension if continues can hamper the growth rate of India and somewhat indirectly contributing to the recession.

Oil Shock

Rebounding oil prices have pushed up oil import costs and will widen India’s currency account deficit. This will, in turn, weigh on the rupee, which is expected to depreciate further, economists say. India could overtake China as the world’s largest oil demand growth centre by 2024, according to a Wood Mackenzie report. Oil prices have shot up this year, and are set to go up further when sanctions on Iran kick in. The increase in oil prices and India being one of the largest importers of crude oil, can lead to an increase in the current account deficit and hence, contributing to the downfall in India’s GDP.

Author
Apoorva Goenka
Team Leader- Equity Research & Valuation
(MSc Finance, NMIMS Mumbai. Batch 2018-20)

Connect with Apoorva on LinkedIn